Posts Tagged ‘ sentence structure ’

Still Life With Novel #1

Last November, I posted this story of my writing process for novel #1. After I finished writing about pigeons, I returned to this project and have been deep in it ever since. So I thought I’d update.

I snapped the shot above because when I finished the current draft and printed it, I felt proud. Now I’m working with this pile of papers to ensure a few things:

  • the story has a day-by-day rhythm that works
  • I’m using sexy, thematically appropriate language and sentence structure
  • the plot makes sense

So what are we looking at in this photo? That stack of paper beside the butt-end of my hot pink stapler, a pen, and a nail file, consists of:

  • a color-coded, day-by-day plot outline
  • theme-word lists for each of the novel’s four sections (on hot orange paper)
  • an 80,000-word manuscript

Yep, the manuscript has almost doubled in size, so I’m also looking for places I can cut. And I’ve joined a local queer/trans writing group where I hope to find some momentum for this final push. After this draft, I’m looking to sell.

Anybody know an agent or publisher looking for a bisexy romp through deadly sin and snow in San Francisco?

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Eroica’s Erotica, Episode 10: Appositives

Pardon me, for this blog post contains sexually explicit examples or content. If you are under the age of 18 or just uncomfortable with sexually explicit material, you may want to check out one of these sites about grammar and writing instead.

Set off with commas any clause or word that’s in apposition to a noun if omitting the phrase would not change the meaning:

Eroica reminded me of my sister, Eliza. Continue reading

Eroica’s Erotica, Episode 9: Missing Antecedents

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Missing antecedents can create silly and mysterious sentences. For instance:

Eroica reached out to grab my hands but then placed them back in her lap.

Okay, exactly whose hands are now in Eroica’s lap? Continue reading

Eroica’s Erotica, Episode 8: Lists

Pardon me, for this blog post contains sexually explicit examples or content. If you are under the age of 18 or just uncomfortable with sexually explicit material, you may want to check out one of these sites about grammar and writing instead. Continue reading

Eroica’s Erotica, Episode 7: Comma Splice

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Here’s an example of how to use your solid understanding of compound and complex sentence structures to fix another problematic sentence, the comma splice:

Eroica and I read the sex scenes to each other for hours, the teasing was excruciating. Continue reading

Eroica’s Erotica, Episode 6: Run-on Sentences

Pardon me, for this blog post contains sexually explicit examples or content. If you are under the age of 18 or just uncomfortable with sexually explicit material, you may want to check out one of these sites about grammar and writing instead.

Run-on sentences have too many elements stuck together in one sentence.

Eroica smiled without judgment and read me another passage this time she placed one hand on my crotch while she read and I could not hide my excitement. Continue reading

Eroica’s Erotica, Episode 5: Sentences With Complex Predicates

Pardon me, for this blog post contains sexually explicit examples or content. If you are under the age of 18 or just uncomfortable with sexually explicit material, you may want to check out one of these sites about grammar and writing instead.

Don’t confuse compound sentences, in which both independent clauses have their own subject, with sentences that have complex predicates, in which the second verb phrase shares the main subject of the sentence with the first and no comma is needed.

I cleared my throat and parted my lips. Continue reading