Posts Tagged ‘ subject ’

Role-Swapping: Subjects, Objects, and a Sexy Trick for Sentence Revision

What do you think of this sentence?

Kiki handed the handcuffs to Al.

When your action is hot, but the sentence is not, try looking at your nouns and their syntax, the roles they play in the sentence.

Kiki is the subject, which drives the action of the sentence.

Handcuffs is the direct object, which receives the action of the verb handed.

Al is the indirect object, which receives the direct object handcuffs.

We’ve got some awfully sexy nouns to work with here, so let’s experiment with role-swapping. That is, change the syntax. What happens when we put Al in the driver’s seat as the subject? What is Al doing?

Al accepted the handcuffs from Kiki.

That’s different at least, but I’m still not feeling it. What if the handcuffs become the subject? What are the handcuffs doing?

The handcuffs fell from Kiki‘s hands into Al‘s.

See how the hot action of the sentence just got a little hotter? By swapping the nouns until you find the sexiest possible syntax, you can build sexy sentences every time.

The Sexy Grammarian teaches writers to create tight, juicy, scantily clad sentences and combines sexually explicit examples with grammar instruction, but she never does it alone. Writing this post, she got extra help from the twitterverse, specifically @EditorMark  @JulieFrayn @GrammarROCKS, and @mededitor. Thanks, tweeps!

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When Nelly Caught Ginny: Phrases, Clauses, and Complete Sentences

Which of these sentences sounds complete to you?

A. Through the drawer of vibrators.
B. Ginny loved it.
C. Playing with other people’s toys.
D. Nelly didn’t mind.

Examples B & D are complete sentences. Examples A and C are fragment sentences. Do you know how to tell the difference?

A complete sentence needs two basic parts of speech: a noun (the subject) and a verb.

That’s why on its own, example A is just a fragment sentence. The drawer and the vibrators give you some nouns to work with, but you’ve got no verb–just a phrase. A phrase does not have both subject and verb. On it’s own, a phrase is just a fragment sentence. Below, it is a phrase in a complete sentence.

Ginny pawed through the drawer of vibrators.

As part of the complete sentence below, example C is a phrase too.

Ginny loved playing with other people’s toys.

Unlike phrases, clauses do have both a subject and a verb.

E. When Nelly caught Ginny.

F. Ginny looked so hot.

But just because a clause has both a subject and a verb doesn’t mean it can stand on its own as a complete sentence. Which of the clauses above do you think is a fragment sentence, and which is a complete sentence?

Example E doesn’t quite make sense on its own. We’re waiting to hear what happened when Nelly caught Ginny. The thought is incomplete, a sentence fragment. But as part of the complete sentence below, we call it a dependent clause.

When Nelly caught Ginny, she didn’t mind.

Example F stands on its own. It’s got a subject, Ginny, and a verb, looked, and the thought’s completed. It’s an independent clause, and it can be a complete sentence on its own.

Still, it’s okay to combine independent clauses with other clauses and phrases to make more interesting and complicated complete sentences.

Ginny looked so hot jerking off.

Ginny looked so hot with Nelly’s vibrator.

Ginny looked so hot that Nelly didn’t mind her playing with other people’s toys.

At Sexy Grammar, we teach writers to create tight, juicy, scantily clad sentences and stories that climax. We incite sexy, bold, free writers. And we combine sexually explicit examples with grammar instruction. You can be a sexy writer, and we can teach you how. We believe that sexy writing is clear, concise, and packed with the delicious, descriptive words that make us all love the art of writing.

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Eradicating Passive Voice

Dear Sexy Grammarian,

Three men robbed the biggest jewelry store.

The biggest jewelry store was robbed by three men.

I had a great question from one of my students when we were talking about passive and active voice today. She asked, if the biggest jewelery store was robbed by three people and I wanted to put the emphasis on the jewelry store because it’s so big, how do I put the jewelry store first without it being passive? I didn’t know what to say.  Just wanted to pick your brain whenever you get a chance.  Thanks so much 🙂

Michelle

Dear Michelle,

Wanting to emphasize the object of an action is the very best reason to use passive voice. So this is a good example of acceptable use of passive voice. Still, there’s a way to get rid of the passive and keep the emphasis on the jewelry store if that’s what you want.

What you need is a new verb. The jewelry store was robbed, yes, but that’s its passive action. What is its active action? It lost, forfeited, and sacrificed, didn’t it? So, I would add something like this to your set of examples:

Three men robbed the biggest jewelry store.

The biggest jewelry store was robbed by three men.

The biggest jewelry store lost its inventory to three robbers.

Fondly,

Kristy

The Sexy G

Frequently, a client or online fan sends me a grammar question, and I always post answers here on the blog.  If you have a question, don’t hesitate to write to me. Looking for more attention? Get affordable, project-focused coaching in person or via Skype or email.

Eroica’s Erotica, Episode 6: Run-on Sentences

Pardon me, for this blog post contains sexually explicit examples or content. If you are under the age of 18 or just uncomfortable with sexually explicit material, you may want to check out one of these sites about grammar and writing instead.

Run-on sentences have too many elements stuck together in one sentence.

Eroica smiled without judgment and read me another passage this time she placed one hand on my crotch while she read and I could not hide my excitement. Continue reading

Eroica’s Erotica, Episode 5: Sentences With Complex Predicates

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Don’t confuse compound sentences, in which both independent clauses have their own subject, with sentences that have complex predicates, in which the second verb phrase shares the main subject of the sentence with the first and no comma is needed.

I cleared my throat and parted my lips. Continue reading

Eroica’s Erotica, Episode 3: Fragment Sentences

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Fragment Sentences do not have the required grammatical elements: a subject and a predicate. This is a simple enough idea:

Eroica’s interest in erotica totally turned me on.

Continue reading

Talking Dirty: Jackie & Jill’s Exciting Climax

Pardon me, for this blog post contains sexually explicit examples or content. If you are under the age of 18 or just uncomfortable with sexually explicit material, you may want to check out one of these sites about grammar and writing instead.

Predicate Nominatives Now you know what to do when the quotation is the direct object of a transitive verb and what to do when the quotation stands alone, but there’s one more possibility:

Jackie’s first question was “What are you hiding in that closet?” Continue reading